Business registration and tax

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All forms of business enterprise except for sole traders have to be registered with the Swedish Companies Registration Office before starting to operate. As a sole trader, you can choose just to register for tax with the Swedish Tax Agency. Use our step-by-step-guides to get started.

Step-by-step-guides

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Sole trader

As a sole trader (self-employed) you need to register your business with the Swedish Tax Agency. You may also, but do not normally, need to register with the Swedish Companies Registration Office.
Sole trader step-by-step-guide

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Limited company

A limited company can be started by one or more natural persons or legal entities. When starting a limited company, you must have at least SEK 50,000 in share capital. You need to register your business with the Swedish Companies Registration Office and the Swedish Tax Agency.
Limited company step-by-step-guide

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Trading partnership

A trading partnership is an alternative if at least two natural persons or legal entities wish to start a business together. You need to register a trading partnership with the Swedish Companies Registration Office and the Swedish Tax Agency.
Trading partnership step-by-step-guide
 

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Considering

Moving to Sweden?

Foreign citizens wishing to start their own company in Sweden are subject to different rules depending on whether they are citizens of a EU/EEA country or citizens of a non-EU/EEA country.

Responsible: Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth

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