Temporary pandemic law for covid-19

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The temporary law came into effect on the 10th of January 2021 and will apply until the 31th of January 2022.

On this page you will find information about:

  1. What does the pandemic law mean for you as a business owner?
  2. Films about the pandemic law

What does the pandemic law mean for you as a business owner?

The purpose of the new law is for the government and authorities to be able to take better measures to slow down the spread of infection, without limiting activities that can be carried out infection-free. This can include limiting the number of visitors, opening hours, or closing certain locations and facilities. The pandemic law applies in addition to the previous recommendations from the Swedish Public Health Agency.

The Swedish Government’s decision on a new pandemic law (in Swedish)

Films about the pandemic law

The films are in Swedish but you can choose English subtitles. Start by playing the film and then click on settings in the Youtube menu. Select Undertexter and then Engelska.

Film: What do the new restrictions mean for businesses?

In this film, we walk you as a business owner through the steps you need to take to comply with the restrictions in the pandemic law. (Length: 2:02 min)

Text version of the film What do the new restrictions mean for business? 

Film: Who is covered by the new law?

In this film, we explain who is covered by the new law, and what is defined as a store and a service facility. (Length: 1:41 min)

Text version of the film Who is covered by the new law? 

Film: Who is responsible for compliance with the pandemic law?

In this film, we explain what your responsibilities as a business owner are. What the supervisory authority (the County Administrative Board) looks at if they review your company, and what happens if the restrictions are not followed. (Length: 1:36 min)

Text version of the film Who is responsible for compliance with the pandemic law? 

Responsible: Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth

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